How can the US support future generations to bring collective creativity and brilliance to the big questions in science and technology? I’m honored to be here with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy for a meeting on a 2050 national strategy for STEMM Equity and Excellence.

At CAT Lab, we continue to see that many of the most important and influential public-interest discoveries on technology and society come from marginalized communities — even when those communities haven’t been included and adequately supported by tech firms and universities. And even as we think about today’s urgent questions about technology in society, we also need to grow the long-term capacity of future generations to navigate questions we can’t yet imagine.

That’s why equity in science is a core part of our work at CAT Lab. It’s why we support community science, civil society, and journalism, it’s central to our work to train and mentor the next generation of scholars, and it’s also why we do research on diversity, equity, and inclusion in science.

even as we think about today’s urgent questions on technology and society, we also need to grow the long-term capacity of future generations to navigate questions we can’t yet imagine

One part of the national strategy involves making progress on inclusion and equity among university faculty, a topic I’ve been grateful to work on with my collaborators Neil Lewis, Jr.Elan Hope, and Travis T. York, Ph.D., and thanks to funding from the Knight Foundation last year:

The new national strategy, whose process was informed by our research, includes two goals related to our work:

  • 100% of R1 and R2 universities adopting evidence-based equity and inclusion strategies and practices for STEMM graduate programs and faculty hiring and advancement
  • Historically excluded and marginalized communities comprise one-third of STEMM faculty by 2045

Even though our research is best known for revealing how slowly higher education is changing, we have also done future projections; these goals are actually possible, with a commitment to deliberate, evidence-based work. I’m honored and excited to gather with hundreds of other leaders working to make this a reality.